Kirkcaldy, former parish, KDT

Grid reference

NT 280 917 (accurate position)

Six-figure easting & northing

328000 691700

Latitude

56.11268190516789

Longitude

-3.157954604625595

County

Fife

Nearby places

St Bryce's Church, Kirkcaldy KDT (0.06 miles)

St Brycedale, land unit Kirkaldy & Dysart (0.14 miles)

St Mary's Well, Kirkcaldy KDT (0.4 miles)

Abbotshall, former parish KDT (0.61 miles)

St Catherinestoun, Kirkcaldy & Dysart (1.08 miles)

Object Classification

Parish (non-extant in 1975)

Is linear feature?

No

Relationships with other parishes

Contains Abbotshall, former parish KDT (formerly)

partly

Within Dysart, former parish, Kirkcaldy & Dysart (formerly)

until 1220

Within Kirkcaldy & Dysart

Relationships with other places

Contains St Bryce's Church, Kirkcaldy KDT

Contains St Mary's Well, Kirkcaldy KDT

Parish details

Kirkcaldy part of Kirkcaldy & Dysart DSX KDT

Parish TLA

KXY

Medieval diocese

St Andrews

Parish notes

The medieval par. of Kirkcaldy KXY was no doubt co-terminous with the shire of Kirkcaldy, first mentioned in the late 11th c., when King Malcolm III and Queen Margaret gave it to their church of the Holy Trinity in Dunfermline (Dunf. Reg. no.1). However, this church's rights to the shire of Kirkcaldy were challenged by Earl Constantine I of Fife, who withheld it from Dunfermline Abbey 'by force' until David I intervened, possibly after Constantine's death c.1130 (Dunf. Reg. no.29). It appears that the church of Kirkcaldy did not achieve full parochial status until 1220. Before this time it was a chapel dependent on the par. church of Dysart DSX. In the years preceding 1220 a dispute had arisen between the church of Dysart and the 'chapel' of Kirkcaldy over this very issue. It was resolved by KXY paying to DSX the sum of 100/- annually, in return for which DSX gave up all rights it might have had in KXY (see Dunf. Reg. no.111). For the implications of this, see DSX Introductory Notes. For the relationship of Bogie to Kirkcaldy parish, see Dysart Introductory Notes below. KXY's church is dedicated to St Bryce, now known as St Brycedale, due to a misinterpretation of St Bryce-dale, where 'dale' is Sc 'share or division of land'. This is found for example in the Sasines of 1819: '5 acres of land called St Brice-dale situated at the back of Kirkcaldy' (Sasines no.12816). St Brice was the unlikely successor of St Martin at Tours. Although there is no surviving medieval source which makes this link (Dove 1988, 140), it is such an obscure and unusual dedication that it probably rests on very old tradition. In 1649 an investigation was underway for the setting up of a new par. to accommodate some landward areas of Kinghorn KGH viz Easter and Wester Tough and Chapel, called then St Ninians Chapell (Stevenson 1900, 342). This led to the creation of Abbotshall AAX, partly out of west KXY, partly out of east KGH, which according to Fasti took place in 1650 (Fasti, 99). There is also mention of the erection of the new kirk at Abbotshall in 1650 (Stevenson 1900, 364). AAX had two very small detached portions completely surrounded by KXY. These consisted of East Smeaton, Smeaton and Smeaton Row, and they were annexed to KXY 1891 (see Shennan 1892, 254-5). In 1901 AAX was taken back into KXY, along with those places mentioned above as having formerly belonged to KGH; at the same time KXY and DSX were amalgamated to form KDT, and a small part of KGH lying south of the mouth of the Teil Burn, which included Brigton * †, was annexed to KDT (Third Statistical Account, Fife, 469). For more discussion of Kirkcaldy as an early shire, and the possible significance of the element caer, see Taylor 1994a, 8-10. For the development of Kirkcaldy as a burgh, see Dunf. Ct. Bk., 17ff. The royal burghs of Kirkcaldy and Dysart were amalgamated in 1930. DYSART DSX, Dysart part of Kirkcaldy KXY & Dysart KDT, FIF, StA Foth, Serf, x, x, x, mw Introductory Notes It appears that the church of Kirkcaldy KXY did not achieve full parochial status until 1220. Before this time it was a chapel dependent on the par. church of Dysart. In the years preceding 1220 a dispute had arisen between the church of Dysart and the 'chapel' of Kirkcaldy over this very issue. It was resolved by KXY paying to DSX the sum of 100/- annually, in return for which DSX gave up all rights it might have had in KXY (see Dunf. Reg. no.111). The church of Wemyss also appears to have originally been subordinate to Dysart church, since even after the former was granted to Soutra Hospital ELO it owed an annual 'pension' to Dysart (Midl. Chrs. (Soutra) no.40; see also WMS Introductory Notes). We thus get a glimpse of a pre-parochial arrangement, with Dysart as a mother-church serving several surrounding churches. Bogie, which lies in the western part of KDT i.e. on the other side of KXY from DSX, is described in 1411 as being in DSX (St A. Lib. 19). The same document describes Bogie as being not only in the sheriffdom, but also in the deanery of Fife, when in fact it was in the deanery of Fothrif. (see also above p.0). Thus it might be inferred that the reference to DSX was equally inaccurate, were it not for the fact that in 1644 the laird of Bogie petitions the Presbytery of Kirckaldy to have his lands of Wester Bogie disjoined from DSX and annexed to KXY (Stevenson 1900, 265). Bogie, therefore, must have remained attached to DSX when KXY became fully independent in the early 13th c.. This may have been due to the link between Dysart and St Serf on the one hand, and Bogie and St Serf's Priory, Loch Leven on the other, a link established by King Macbeth’s grant of cain from Wester Bogie in the 11th c . (. (St A. Lib. 12; see below under Bogie). The link between Dysart and St Serf is first mentioned c.1200, and in all probability rests on a genuine association from the time of St Serf himself, who may have flourished around 700 (Macquarrie 1993, 132-3 and 140; see also above pp.12). Its medieval church is dedicated to him, and a few metres away lies the cave in which St Serf is alleged to have had his famous conversation with the Deil. This is first recorded in the anonymous Vita Sancti Servani, and repeated in the Aberdeen Breviary (1 July) (Macquarrie 1993, 140). Wyntoun also tells of this encounter, but does not locate it. However, he mentions Dysart and St Serf in another context: after meeting St Adomnán on Inchkeith KE, on the advice of that saint, he sends his followers to Dysart (Chron. Wyntoun ii pp.38-9). In 1901, at the same time as Abbotshall AAX was taken back into KXY, KXY and DSX were amalgamated, to form KDT (Third Statistical Account, Fife, 469). The royal burghs of Dysart and Kirkcaldy were amalgamated in 1930.